Bank size: It does not necessarily refer to the total number of compartments, but rather the number of compartments wide the entire cabinet is. So a bank of three may contain six lockers, for example, if they are two-tier lockers. In short, the total number of lockers is the bank size multiplied by the number of tiers. Sometimes the term "bay" is used instead of "bank", although "bank" appears to be the more standard term; on other occasions, "bay" refers to a single locker width within a bank, including all tiers of locker directly on top of each other.

Clean/dirty lockers normally have two or three parts within the locker. One part is meant for dirty or clothes that are worn, and the other side for clean clothes. These lockers are meant for hospitals or other medical workplaces where it is useful to keep work and personal clothes apart to reduce the risk of infection. These lockers are also useful for factories where work clothes can become dirty and it can be very useful to keep them apart from personal clothes.


One thing that box lockers can’t do that nearly all other styles of lockers can (depending on their height) is hang garments. Box lockers allow for a maximum number of units in a small space, but are too small to hang your jacket. Garment lockers utilize box lockers, and a coat rod is mounted under the lockers between the vertical sections. This allows for employees to hang full length garments, while still being able to secure their other personal items in their individual lockers.

Used lockers are typically small storage compartments that vary in size and shape, and usually has the option of locking shut. They are useful in schools and locker rooms to anywhere where secure storage is desired. There are many different styles, including box lockers, half door, full door, and triple tear. There are also specialty lockers like garment and two person lockers with hat shelves.

Gym Locker

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