Lockers are usually physically joined together side by side in banks, and are commonly made from steel, although wood, laminate, and plastic are other materials sometimes found. Steel lockers which are banked together share side walls, and are constructed by starting with a complete locker; further lockers may then be adding by constructing the floor, roof, rear wall, door, and just one extra side wall, the existing side wall of the previous locker serving as the other side wall of the new one. The walls, floors, and roof of lockers may be either riveted together (the more traditional method) or, more recently, welded together.

Penco school lockers feature a stainless steel recessed handle that provides a smooth, catch-free front and protects padlocks from being tampered with. Locker doors feature spot welding for rigidity. Doors are louvered for ventilation. Office storage lockers include continuous door strikes to ensure secure closure and rubber padding to dampen closing noise. Metal lockers have 5-knuckle hinges for strength. Latching channels have nylon glides to reduce sound when opening or closing. Legs add 6" to height. Single Tier Office Lockers have 3-point latching (top, bottom and sides). 18”D lockers include coat hooks and a coat rod. Double and Triple Tier Employee Lockers have 2-point latching (top and bottom). Includes coat hook. It's recommended to anchor steel lockers to floor and/or wall for safety. Powder coat finish.
Used lockers are typically small storage compartments that vary in size and shape, and usually has the option of locking shut. They are useful in schools and locker rooms to anywhere where secure storage is desired. There are many different styles, including box lockers, half door, full door, and triple tear. There are also specialty lockers like garment and two person lockers with hat shelves.

Gym Locker

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